Listening to Wang Lee Hom (王力宏) to Study Chinese

As I’m continuing to study Chinese, I’ve gotten into listening to Chinese-language music in order to accustom myself to the pronunciation and the sound of the language. Granted, it might be a stylized or exaggerated pronunciation sometimes, but it’s still a good tool. I listen to mostly Wang Lee Hom (王力宏), though I have two songs by Jay Chou (周杰倫). I’m not a huge fan of Jay Chou, because of his strange voice quality.

As for Wang Lee Hom, I really like his songs and the meanings of the lyrics are fairly accessible, even to me, a person outside the culture. Some songs I recently got and liked include 就是現在 (jiù shì xiànzài – “Now Is the Time”) and 你的愛 (nĭ de ài – “Your Love”).

You might think that the reason I encourage people to listen to music in their target language is for acquiring vocabulary. That’s partly true, since you’re being exposed to new words. But more than that, music, especially popular music, is an excellent window into the culture. Popular music incorporates concepts, contexts, and thought processes that naturally occur in the language, and is a part of understanding culture as much as food or art.

For example, some of the titles and lyrics of Wang Lee Hom’s songs include references to Chinese proverbs and poetry. The song, 天翻地覆 (tiān fān dì fù) translates to “heaven and earth overturned”, which is a paraphrase of poetry and has acquired the meaning of “snafu” or “everything turned upside down”. Think of it as a kind of acronym. This use of a reference to a classical art form is likely something that most Chinese speakers appreciate, and it is likely understood as a clever usage. Such things give insight into the way cultures and languages think.

This post was kind of short, but it was just a little thing I was thinking about, so I decided to write about it. In other news, I’m going to be trying to start up my YouTube channel again and make videos, which may be difficult, given all my work at university and lack of a real space to make my videos. Please check it out and also purchase my language guides to help Akshayapatra Foundation feed underprivileged Indian school children! Your purchase is going toward a good cause!

My Chinese Learning Progress!

So, as you may or may not know, I’ve been learning Mandarin Chinese for the last six months. I’m making slow but steady progress, thanks to my Mandarin-speaking friends at NYU! They all speak Taiwanese Mandarin, so I’m getting used to that more than Mainland or Standard Mandarin. I also practice traditional Chinese instead of simplified, since kanji in Japanese are largely in their traditional forms, which will make learning Japanese later on easier for me. For those who don’t know, simplified is exactly what you think it is: simpler versions of certain characters to expedite writing. Traditional is still used in Hong Kong and Taiwan, as well as in calligraphy and writing that is meant to look aesthetically more appealing.

In this post, I’m going to list the characters that I know so far, so that you can use this list if you so desire. I’ve been learning them in sets of 5-8 characters per set, which may or may not consist of related words. My general rule is that I practice a word (not just characters!) enough times to fill out three lines until I feel that I’ve memorized the word. To test myself, before I start a new set on a blank page, I write out the sets of my characters, labeling them by number. Once I finish writing them all out, I then write the pīnyīn as well as the meaning. Another thing I do is write out mini-conversations to help practice using the words in context, and I ask my friends to look over them.

So here are my first eight sets: (First is traditional and then simplified)

Set 1:

時間/时间 – shíjān – time
點(鍾)/点(钟) – … o’clock (ex. 八點(鐘)/点(钟) = 8 o’clock); you don’t have to say 鍾/钟
半 – bàn – half, partly, halfway; there is a similar character 伴 that means “to accompany”
刻 – kè – quarter
分鐘/分钟 – fēnzhōng – minute (again, you don’t have to say 鍾/钟)

Set 2:

剛才/刚才 – gāngcái – (just) now
小時/小间 – xiăoshí – hour (“little time”)
應該/应该 – yīnggāi – should/must/ought
秒 – miăo – second
現在/现在 – xiànzài – now

Set 3:

呢 – ne – additive particle (“What about you?”; That’s the kind of situation where this would be attached to the pronoun)
老師/老师 – lăoshī – teacher
謝謝/谢谢 – xièxie – thank you
沒/没 – mĕi – negative particle (for 有 and 過/过)
有 – yŏu – to have/exist
(要/想) – (yào/xiăng) – to want/intend to (direct/polite); these are different words for the same idea, but not traditional versus simplified

Set 4:

幾/几 – jĭ – how many (can be substituted with 多少 (duōshào); needs to be used with a measure word, like 個/个)
前天 – qiántiān – day before yesterday
作天 – zuótiān – yesterday
上學/上学 – to attend (a school)
走 – zŏu – to walk/general verb of motion (very easy to confuse with 去 (), which means “to go”)
再見/再见 – zàijiàn – goodbye

Set 5:

早上 – zăoshàng –  early morning
上午 – shàngwŭ – late morning
中午 – zhōngwŭ – noon
下午 – xiàwŭ – afternoon
晚上 – wănshàng – evening

Set 6:

去年 – qùnián – last year (“gone year”)
今年 – jīnniān – this year
明年 – míngnián – next year
上個/上个 – shàngge – last…
上次 – shàngcì – last time
這個/这个 – zhège – this
下個/下个 – xiàge – next…

Set 7:

喝 – hē – to drink
吃 – chī – to eat
飯/饭 – fàn – meal/food (attach at front 早, 午, or 晚 to make “breakfast”, “lunch”, or “dinner”)
咖啡 – kāfēi – coffee
茶 – chá – tea

Set 8:

(號/号)/日 – hào/rì – date
星期 – xīngqī – week (add to end number 1-6 for Monday through Saturday; add 天 for Sunday)
月 – yuè – month (add number 1-12 before for January through December)
零 – líng – zero
都 – dōu – all/even
生日 – shēngrì – birthday

I hope you find this post useful for your own Chinese studies, and please don’t forget to share this on Facebook and Tumblr!

Keeping Up With the Times

So, here’s my first post in a really long time! I’ve been very busy with studying at NYU so I haven’t had time to really write on the blog, but now I’ve thought of a topic! Recently, I’ve been watching a Taiwanese drama to improve my passive understanding of Chinese and practicing parsing spoken Chinese. (I’m using a Taiwanese drama because most of my Mandarin-speaking friends at NYU speak Taiwanese Mandarin, which does have some differences from China’s variety.) This drama, the name of which is PS男 (PS Man), is from 2009 and while very helpful in practicing listening to Chinese, has aged quite a bit. They still use the first iPhones, for one! But more importantly, this brings to mind something else: changes in language. It can be as recent as four or five years ago, and a language can start exhibiting changes in the most minute details, whether it be new slang or new standards imposed by the government.

These changes require the language learner to be ever vigilant. But how, you may ask, can a novice in a language possibly recognize such things?  What you can do, is try to only use contemporary, or at least the most recent, materials available on the language. This can mean a textbook written this year or an ongoing TV show that airs every week. However, you should be careful about TV shows; some TV shows like Downton Abbey are written in an archaic or old-fashioned register of English that no one actually uses. But that doesn’t mean these types of shows aren’t helpful. At higher levels of language learning, such as a point at which one might be going to study abroad, it is important to be aware of certain cultural nuances that accompany a language’s archaic style. There may be jokes or puns that people may make in real life that are drawn from such sources, and they can help to understand the language and the culture on a deeper level.

Another important aspect of language learning as it pertains to contemporary materials is, of course, the language itself. What do people say? And how are they saying it? This is where old-time-y and historical shows fail the language learner, however fascinating they may be. You need to watch shows and movies, listen to music, and read books that someone your age who speaks your target language natively would be exposed to. This is fundamental to understanding how culture works in a modern society constantly in flux, especially in societies where ancient social structures have persisted for centuries and how that fits into everyday life. It’s important to understand the place of women in Indian society when learning Hindi, for example. You will not fully understand the content of a movie like Mardaani if you do not. It is a movie that deals with prostitution rings in India and how people deal with them, particularly the police. This is highly relevant to the average Indian that speaks Hindi, as it speaks to a prevalent issue in their society. Bollywood has seen an increase in socially conscious films that address certain issues in Indian society and that is something that directly affects the media produced by a Hindi speaking population. As such, a language learner, especially one who is not of an ethnicity or nationality that speaks that language, should be keenly aware of the social dynamics and politics of the society that uses their target language.

You may think you don’t need to understand these things in your target language, but believe me, it helps a lot when coming to understand a language. Think of a language as person who’s going to be your roommate for a while; you need to get used to them. Don’t block out the eccentricities and weirdness, but instead, learn from it. This is particularly relevant to me, a first-year university student, living with two roommates in a dorm! Getting along with your language (or a roommate for that matter) is critical to making progress and understanding the culture and society in which that language is predominant.

I hope you enjoyed this piece after a long period of no posts! Please don’t forget to share this post on whatever platform you use social media!