“It’s Raining Husbands” and Other Idioms Translated into Different Languages

“It’s Raining Husbands” and Other Idioms Translated into Different Languages.

This is an interesting article from Lingholic. Just to add to the fun, I’m going to talk about a few idioms and proverbs from different languages that I know!

ಮಂಗನಿಗೆ ಮನಿಕ್ಕ್ಯ ಕೊಟ್ಟ ಹಂಗೆ. – Maṅganige manikkya koṭṭa haṅge. – As if giving a monkey a pearl.

This Kannada proverb is used when somebody does something for or gives something to somebody else, and that person has no need for it. This is usually in the context of that person not being able to use it or appreciate it.

l’espantacriatures – an intimidating person

This is an idiom from Catalan, and literally means “child-scarer”. The word criatura means child, and espantar means to scare. It’s pretty obvious that a person who scares children is intimidating!

 

Em casa de ferreiro, espeto de pau. – In the house of the blacksmith, a wood skewer.

This is an interesting proverb in Portuguese. It’s talking about a situation in which something or someone doesn’t belong. And that thing or person shouldn’t be there, or do whatever they’re doing. A wood skewer doesn’t belong in a blacksmith’s house, because it would burn and be of no use. It’s kind of like getting in someone’s way.

l’attaccabottoni – A person who corners and presses others with long and sad stories. 

This is an interesting Italian word, because it is one of several very specific words in Italian that we might find very useful in English. I wasn’t aware that this was a type of person until I learned the word. It literally means “attacks the buttons”. Ordinarily you’d think this is like the phrase “pushing someone’s buttons” in English, but it has a completely different meaning in Italian!

(नमक मिर्च/मसाला) लगाना – (Namak mirch/masala) lagaana – to put salt and pepper/spice

This Hindi idiom is pretty useful if you have a lot of friends who gossip. A lot of Indians and Indian Americans use this phrase in English, too! By putting salt and pepper (or masala, which means spice), you’re hiding other flavors or you’re changing the taste a lot. As you might be able to tell, this means to change the story or make it more dramatic or scandalous to make it more interesting when you tell other people.

This was a little short this time, but I hope you found it interesting! Follow Lingholic for more cool stuff on languages. Their tips are really good!

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sr3934@nyu.edu

I'm a student studying at NYU, hoping to pursue a career in diplomatic services, and I'm obsessed with learning and teaching foreign languages. I like to practice Taekwondo, enjoy Square Enix video games, and engage in Asian-American social activism and international political activism.