Week 3: Finding the Right Fit

Here’s my rundown of my third week in China! Note: I should probably note that this is actually my fourth week in China, since I spent the first week mostly moving in and doing orientation-related activities for school. But I’m just going to run with the numbers I’ve done so far. With that, here we go!

Shopping in Shanghai

Shanghai is an enormous city, just like New York, and can be divided into at least two areas, roughly speaking: Puxi and Pudong. Puxi is west of the river, and is where most nightlife, shopping, restaurants, and generally fun things to do are located. Pudong is primarily a financial district, with many of Shanghai’s corporations, banks, and other companies having buildings here. It’s also where NYU Shanghai is located, so I’m in Pudong most of the week. That’s not to say there’s nothing to do in Pudong, since there are a few malls here and there, along with food stalls that open

On the weekends, I usually go to somewhere in Puxi with friends, and this weekend, shopping was a big part of my travels. Specifically, I was trying to find a new pair of shoes, ones that I could wear for going out, but not casual. Regardless of what I was looking for, I wasn’t going to find it in any store whatsoever.

I’m a fairly large person, even in the US (though definitely on the smaller end of plus size individuals). This is especially true in China, where people my size are few and far between (yes, I’m aware that people like Yao Ming exist). But the trouble for them, and expats of my size, is finding clothing items that fit them. For me personally, finding clothes wasn’t a huge issue, since if I go to Western stores like Zara and Uniqlo, there will usually be larger sizes like XL and XXL available (my usually size range when shopping). Chinese brands are a little harder, and XL is considered quite big, and generally speaking, I have to look for at least a size larger for a given item to fit.

IFC Mall

However, shoes are the biggest problem. I wear a US size 13, which is about as far as most US outlets go, though some stock up to 14 or 15 (I haven’t seen anything larger). But in China, they use the European sizing system, which I believe is in centimeters. It is ridiculously difficult to find my size in China!  Contrary to most sites with equivalency tables, a 46 is NOT a size 13; it’s a 12.5 at best, since I ordered a pair of size 46 shoes from Taobao (the Chinese version of Amazon, though with much lower prices), and they were too small! I started asking for 47, but even in most Western brand stores, the largest size I found was a 44. The one time I did find a size 47, it was in a Clarks, and it was ridiculously priced at around 1800 RMB for a shoe I didn’t feel was particularly worth the expense.

My online searches seemed to indicate that the only recourse was to find stores that explicitly stock plus-sized shoes, look more online, or go to places like Charles Philip to have a custom pair of shoes handmade (which I don’t recommend unless you have the money to spare). For now, I’m sticking to trying to find something online again. If anyone has some ideas, I’m all ears!

Adventures in Food

My travels in food this week brought me to relatively more upscale places than I usually frequent in New York. When you’re vegetarian in the US, it’s commonly assumed that you really can’t eat anything, and by extension, anything you can eat is relatively inexpensive. I am used to paying no more than $13-14 USD for my meals in New York (which I consider somewhat pricey, given my frugal upbringing).

I was surprised to see that the vast majority of vegetarian and vegan restaurants in Shanghai seem to be fairly upscale. I can’t really guess as to why this is the case, but since the RMB is only around $0.15, and I might not get the chance to do this again, I figured that spending a little extra on food is not such a bad thing. At my school’s cafeteria, my meals run from about 10 to 30 kuai, the colloquial word for the RMB in English, from the word 快/塊 (kuài), which is the measure word for currency in Mandarin. Interestingly enough, the colloquial word for the RMB in Mandarin, 元 (yuán), is sometimes used as the formal term for the RMB in English, labeled as the CNY (Chinese yuan).

Anyway, my vegetarian meals at restaurants in Shanghai are also usually no more than about 20-30 kuai, though sometimes I’ve spent 40-50 kuai, usually by buying a drink. Specialty drinks, such as mocktails or freshly brewed tea can often cost an extra 10 to 30 kuai, depending on the restaurant. This weekend, my friends and I went to the Portmann Ritz-Carlton, and checked out the restaurants near there, including one called Beef and Liberty, which is to the left of the entrance of the hotel as you walk toward it (to the right if you’re coming out). Coincidentally, Saigon Mama (the Vietnamese restaurant I went to from last week) is directly across from Beef and Liberty.

 

 

 

 

 

Beef and Liberty is a fairly small American burger restaurant, and despite its name, serves a variety of different burgers, including a vegetarian falafel burger! Be warned, as it is pricier than most restaurants I’ve been to so far. Sadly, the only vegetarian burger they have is their falafel burger, but fret not, as it was one of the best burgers I’ve ever had! (That means something coming from someone who doesn’t really like burgers in the first place!)

The Falafel Burger (with a side of fries)

The falafel burger burger has a sesame sauce and a harissa yogurt sauce on it, so it has a bit of a kick, but the yogurt tames it a little bit (I would have preferred plain harissa, to be honest). While most people tend to thing of veggie burgers as not real burgers or not substantial enough, this burger was a hefty one, with a thick, crunchy exterior, but soft and almost fluffy inside. Each burger comes with a side of fries that aren’t oily and not too crunchy either, which I quite appreciated, and it certainly filled me up.

Aerial view (for an idea of how big it is)

But something must be said about the ketchup. Now, most ketchup in the US (which is often Heinz ketchup) is very sweet and seems unnaturally smooth and shiny. I usually avoid ketchup in favor of hot sauces like Sriracha and Cholula. Beef and Liberty provides bottles of Wilkin and Sons ketchup on each table, which was far better than most ketchup I’ve had, with a sweetness that came from the tomatoes and a little sugar, rather than corn syrup (the predominant sweetener in the US). It was more natural-tasting, and I really enjoyed the meal overall. The bottles don’t have a lot in them, so be careful about running out (I don’t know if they charge to replace them)!

The whole meal came out to 78 kuai, plus 30 kuai for a drink (a Liberty Lemonade, a sparkling lemonade with mint essentially) . For 108 kuai, which is around $16.33, I paid for a meal that I quite enjoyed, and certainly for which I will be back in my time in Shanghai. I might not get the drink next time, simply because I usually don’t order them, and I didn’t think it was anything special. I then proceeded to pay 88 kuai for a “temperance cocktail”  (fancy word for a mocktail) at the Waldorf Astoria Long Bar, called the Secret Garden. It was quite good, flavored with elderflower, kiwi, and apple.

I don’t drink alcohol, but alcohol prices in China are also fairly low compared to the US (so I’m told). My friends frequently buy several bottles of soju and beer from the nearby Family Mart (the Chinese 7-11; called 全家 (quán jiā) in Mandarin) every weekend after dinner (if not more often). Restaurants may charge around 20-50 kuai for a glass of beer or wine.

ರಕ್ತ (rakta – blood; Kannada) superimposed onto 家 (jiā – family; Mandarin)

Another interesting thing I came across was that one of my favorite stores, Muji, is completely different in China. It’s mostly a clothing store in China, whereas in the US, their products primarily consist of home goods and stationery. I can’t speak to the quality of their clothing, but they sell a variety of pens, notepads, and other stationery that are quite good quality (especially the pens). The pens don’t bleed and they come in different sizes. The Chinese locations sell brush pens, which they seem to have discontinued in the US, and it’s a shame because they’re really quite good quality! To the right is one of my calligraphy pieces using a Muji brush pen.

However, I discovered another oddity at Muji: ASIAN FOOD KITS. I’ve never seen these items at the Muji stores in the US, and I had no idea they make these things. I don’t know about the quality, but I will have to try it some time (the prices on these seem a little high in my opinion).

Anyway, that’s all for this week, and I look forward to writing next week’s post!

A Language Few Cared to Know

Growing up in the United States as the child of immigrants has presented me with unique circumstances, particularly with respect to language and culture. Unlike the majority of my classmates in elementary and even middle school, I had grown up immersed in two different languages. When I was young, a speech problem prevented me from speaking in complete sentences. When the doctors told my parents that two languages would confuse me, my parents obviously chose English (this notion that multiple languages confuse children is patently false, by the way). As a result, my Kannada was effectively non-existent in my childhood. And it hung over my head like a rain cloud, the pangs of guilt hitting me like raindrops.

Even though I couldn’t speak Kannada very well, it was very much a part of my life. My parents used Kannada at home to talk to me, despite the fact that I would most likely respond in English. And when I tried to respond in my mother tongue, I was miserably poor at it. It was only after years of practice and many instances of trial and error that my Kannada became better. Granted, I still have problems with rhythm when I speak, and an unfortunate tendency to speak too fast. The Kannada Duolingo project that I’ve been working on has helped me in expanding my vocabulary and knowledge of the language, though.

But all the same, Kannada is very much a present language in my life. As a child, there were several words in Kannada that I thought were words in English, often leading to my teachers and classmates’ confusion. Growing up, most of my school friends spoke Tamil, Telugu, Bengali, or Gujarati. My family friends largely spoke Hindi. Kannada is a language spoke in one state in India, and the proportion of immigrants to the United States from that state is much smaller. As a result, I had little exposure to other people my age who spoke Kannada. This has change the way I view Kannada, because when I translate it, the English always feels very archaic or formal, in my mind. This might be because the only people I ever spoke it with were my older relatives, my parents, and my older brother. In the present, I try to keep in touch with my mother tongue as much as possible, because it is something that I’m passionate about passing down to my children. I speak Kannada to myself because I have very few opportunities to use it at NYU with other students or anyone else, for that matter.

Over the years, I’ve become very acutely aware of the fact that there is little demand for Kannada at all. This is a reality that I accept and deal with. But that’s not to say I like it. But it’s not even that I wish people needed Kannada more. I grew up around people who spoke different languages, and we often shared our unique cultural practices and languages with one another. But I don’t think I’ve really met anyone who was interested in Kannada, even as a polite gesture. While my Telugu and Korean speaking friends exchanged their languages, I sat silently, because no one asked. Kannada was really just a language that no one really cared to know.

Part of me hopes that this Duolingo project will help bring more awareness to the Kannada-speaking community. Kannada youth in the United States are in dire need of modernization of Kannada and the ability to converse with people their own age. The Kannada-speaking community is scattered, at least where I lived. This prevents real engagement with our language, since we don’t feel the need to use it with anyone else outside our families. I’m fairly certain that this is the case for other lesser-known languages of the world. Why would we speak the language as much if we have so few people to speak it with, and in very limited ways? I almost never talk about politics in Kannada, so my ability to discuss it in Kannada is basically non-existent. It would consist of lots of loanwords from English, to the point that an English speaker can probably still figure out what I’m saying, without any knowledge of Kannada. This is my philosophy for including a wide variety of topics in my language guides. Being able to discuss many different topics with a basic set of core vocabulary words helps with making the language more useful and more applicable to one’s daily life. The more situations you can use the language, the more likely you’re going to use it. At least, that’s what I think.

Ideally, I’d like that people of different language communities can actually find each other, instead of giving up on their language entirely. But only the future can say what will actually happen.

The Challenges in the Life of a Polyglot-in-Training

This is something that all polyglots, and even language learners who aren’t planning to learn any more languages, should read. Working on a language is a long and grueling process, which catches up to even the best of us. That said, we shouldn’t get lazy because we feel like we’re not getting anywhere. In fact, if you’re in that place, chances are that there’s an area you need to focus on. But it’s not wrong to take a break once in a while. In this post, I’m going to talk about the things that challenge me when learning languages, and what to do about it.

Leafing through so many resources to find certain information.

This is a big part of my work on language learning and on my books. Depending on the language, this can be incredibly frustrating. This is actually why the Hindi book is coming along so slowly. There are very few good sites out there that describe Hindi grammar, though my personal favorites are hindilanguage.info and learning-hindi.com. Even those either are largely restricted to very basic things or don’t explain the grammar in a way that makes sense to me. This is coming from a person who prefers to use grammar as the basis for language learning! But whether the language is Hindi or Italian, it takes a while for me to compile the information into notes and coherent lessons. Sometimes, I just find it all so tiring that I just let it be for a little bit. I’ll go watch some television or read and let my mind unwind a bit. Never be afraid to get up and walk around for an hour to just take a break. Don’t do what I did and work all day and all night, going to sleep at 1 or 2 in the morning on a regular basis for an entire summer. Believe me, it wrecks your sleep schedule and wears you out.

Learning from others and not being afraid to do so.

This has two situations packed into it. First, there’s learning from native speakers. The whole point of learning a language is to talk to these people! Don’t be afraid to speak up, try out your skills, and see what they say! Most of the time, they’re happy to oblige to correct you if you’re wrong about something. You should be careful about what and how you say things, though. I’m attending university in New York City, and while there are plenty of people to practice my languages with (particularly Mandarin for me right now), there are definitely people who are not in the mood! The other situation in with this piece of advice is other polyglots or learners who are fairly advanced in their learning. If they speak your target language better than you, then listen to them! Other people’s experience is invaluable to building your own. Standing on the shoulders of giants, in a way (I realize that’s not what it means but it works for the situation). Ask them about what they did to get so good at speaking a language or learning in general. It will help you in the long run, especially if you’re in a slump.

Find what works for you. Experiment!

When it comes to method, there is no one method that works. Software like Pimsleur and Glossika (the latter of which I love) can be touted as the best way to learn a language, but everyone has their own way. For example, Duolingo is a good way to keep some practice going, but personally, I find it very bland to a point. The language used in Duolingo is restricted to as many phrases are put in the system (nothing you can do about this), which does an admirable job. But to be honest, Duolingo should encourage what I call the “synthesis” skill, which is crucial to learning a language. “Synthesis” is being able to concoct and put together new sentences yourself without having to pause too much. But that’s just my opinion. Don’t take my word for it and try it out for yourself! It’s important to test out different things and find a sure-fire method tailored for your needs.

Take a break!

I already said this, but I can’t stress enough how important it is to do this. Set your materials and notes aside for a moment, and do something else! You need give your brain time to process all the information you’re taking in. That’s why sleep is important, too, so don’t sacrifice your physical well-being! By taking a break, you’ll be able to test how well you retain information in the long-term. Even though Memrise prompts me to work on it every day, I only do it once in a while to refresh my memory, at least for the languages I’m already quite familiar with.

That’s my piece for now, but I hope you guys re-read some of the older articles as well. Please don’t forget to share this on Facebook and Tumblr!