3 Really Good Reasons to Learn Portuguese

We always go on and on about the professional merits of learning languages, and subordinate the cultural and internal benefits. Here, I’m going to give you 5 good, non-job-related reasons to learn Portuguese.

1. The music and dance. Portugal and Brazil have rich musical and dance traditions. Brazil is particularly strong in both, with its extravagant festivals for Carnival that include samba accompanied by loud, upbeat music. Portugal’s fado is also quite famous, and has two variants: fado de Lisboa and fado de Coimbra. The first simply refers to the kind that originated in Lisbon, which is often mournful, slow, and a bit emotional (lots of unrequited love, poverty, and misery). The second, which is from the city of Coimbra, is the polar opposite, being fast, lively, and extremely optimistic. Portugal is home to many folk dances as well, if you’re interested in the more traditional roots of the Luso-Brazilian culture.

2. The people. Brazilian and Portuguese people are very different, which can also be seen in the language. Brazilian people are very upbeat, happy, and inclusive people. Brazilians typically say a gente (the people) to mean, “us”. They also don’t have the tu-vous distinction with tu (informal) and você (formal), using only the latter to say, “you”. Brazilian Portuguese is also very prone to making innocent words into those of a sexual nature. If you learn Portuguese from my guide, you’ll see this. Brazilians very much want to be your friend.

Portuguese people, on the other hand, are more traditional, especially when it comes to the language, preserving spellings that aren’t even observed in the spoken language. Portuguese people are very big on manners and formalities, but this is not to say that Portuguese people are uptight. Portuguese people appreciate people who follow social conventions, and are very willing to help you if you just ask. The Portuguese people also have a great respect for their elders and their family, and becoming a friend of the family is a sign of being a good friend to them.

3. A greater sense of emotion. Portuguese has this wonderful thing called saudade, which, while being concise, roughly translates to the nostalgia you feel when recalling something that has gone away, and will most likely never return. Portuguese is a good language for emotion, particularly regarding love. The word apaixonar-se technically means, “to fall in love,” but is usually used in the present tense, which has a special meaning in Portuguese. It describes the feeling of continually experiencing love and being more enamored with the other person.

That’s all I’ve got for today! Please leave any comments you might have, reblog this post, and/or share/like it on Facebook!

Lost in Translation

I must confess that I really hate it when people’s argument against foreign language is, “Everyone speaks English anyway,” or, “Just put it through Google Translate.” Google Translate is not at all effective. I only use it because its voices for various languages are pretty good, and I can get the pronunciation of a sentence that I write in.

Sure, translation is handy when you just don’t have the time to sit and learn the language, or when it’s a really short term thing. But there is a lot of stuff lost in translation, because what there are sentiments and concepts that exist as certain things in one language, and don’t translate completely into English or whatever other language it is. Famous examples on which lengthy papers and books have been written include saudade, sprezzatura, duende, and schadenfreude. There are very, very specific meanings, interpretations, and usages associated with these words, that are very hard to translate into another language.

A very good example exists in manga and anime. I myself do watch anime (though not much anymore, mostly because I tend to be picky) and read a few mangas. Manga, especially, is an example of imperfect translation. Translator notes around the panels often indicate the reason for a particular translation, or choice to leave a name in Japanese. For example, in the manga “Noragami,” the translator decided to translate the name of a character named Bishamonten as Vaisravana and Veena (different instances of the name). Bishamonten is derived from a name in Sanskrit from a Buddhist text. It makes very little sense to give the original name of the deity rather than what she is referred to as in the manga. Bishamonten holds more meaning in the original Japanese, and Vaisravana and Veena (which is even less appropriate, because it refers to an entirely different goddess from Hinduism, Saraswati) mean even less to English readers.

An example of an accurate and appropriate translation occurs in the anime Fairy Tail (though this may be because it’s been licensed and translated by more experienced translators). One of the protagonists’ names is Natsu, which means “summer,” in Japanese. Here, his name is not translated into English.

In the original Japanese text, any puns, jokes, or allusions apparent to Japanese readers will not be so obvious to English readers. Names play an important role in the way things are read in manga. This is because manga writers frequently do word plays and allusions to various things revolving around the way things are named.

Yet another example is a manga that my friend reads (the name escapes me right now), in which the female protagonist is frequently referred to as takane-no-hana, which means “a flower on a high peak.” The expression in Japanese refers to something out of one’s reach. This means absolutely nothing to the reader in English, so the translator decided to tell the reader in the beginning.

These are yet more reasons why you should learn another language, so that you can experience the original text in the way it was intended to be. Feel free to leave comments and share this post!

Language is Social

It feels as if it’s been forever since I posted last. I hope all of you who have summer vacation are enjoying some relaxation in whatever way that pleases you. Anyway, my topic this time is about language as a social experience.

By definition, language is a communicative tool, and for communication to be what it is, there has to be two or more people involved. You have to be involved with other people when speaking a language. You’re never going to get your practical skills down unless you practice with someone else. Besides, humans, by nature, are a gregarious species. We like to be with others of our own kind (most of the time), and we want to get our ideas across to other people as best as we can.

Many of the most basic words in any language have to do with relations with other people and social interactions. For example, take the word, “mother,” or, “mom.” It’s easily one of the most common words that people use in their mother tongues (there’s a reason that term is phrased that way) starting from early childhood. Languages wouldn’t have a word for it if the word didn’t really matter to the people who speak it. Now, let’s take a more complex word: saudade. It’s a word in Portuguese describing an intense feeling of longing or yearning for something that has been lost or has gone away, and usually will not return. Portuguese people use this word primarily in reference to people, because you usually don’t have such an intense feeling in relation to an inanimate object.

Learning a language, therefore, must also be a fundamentally social activity. You can get only so far in learning by yourself, looking up grammar and vocabulary, and talking to yourself. When you learn a language, you should engage someone else in the process. There are three set-ups to this:

1. You and a native speaker (Student to Teacher)

2. You and another person, each speaking (a) language(s) the other wants to learn (Teacher to Teacher)

3.  You and another person, both learning the same language (Student to Student)

So, get out there and learn with someone! There’s always someone out there who’s willing to walk with you on the path to learning a new language!